His Holiness the Dalai Lama: Chinese Invasion of Tibet (Part A)

New York, N.Y. “Invasion of China begins around 1950″I met Mr. Dalai Lama last month.I was the first Japanese person to be loved by His Majesty the Dalai Lama. I’ve met every year since 1971. The reason for this was that I was interested in Tibetan folk operas and had a hard time introducing them to the West. (See Part 3)

Reunion after a long time, private audience I hadn’t seen him for a while since I had been seriously injured two years ago, so I contacted him this time and said, “I’ll see you on September 27.” I decided to visit the hospital. Recently, it seems that she rarely has a private audience. After hugging as usual and talking about various things, I received a small statue of Buddha.I don’t know much about Dalai Lama, so I would like to talk about it.Tibet occupied China after adulthood

His Majesty was born on July 6, 1935, in a small rural village called Amdo. He was clearly reincarnated as a reincarnation of XIII when some high priests visited and examined it. At the age of three, he left his parents and was taken to Lhasa to be crowned in 1940. The Dalai Lama’s position is always inherited by its predecessor’s reincarnation.Although he became a fine adult after many years of strict Buddhist teaching, the invasion of China began in 1950, Tibet was unilaterally forced to be part of China (Article 17 agreement), and Tibet began to be occupied. It was He visited China many times, negotiated with leaders, and worked hard to praise peace and friendship, but it was a shock when Mao Zedong said religion was a poison for humanity.

Exiled to India 60 years ago Around 1950, the rule of China became very strong, and finally the uprising of Tibetans on March 10, 1959 caused the Dalai Lama to escape from Lhasa on 17th and exile in India beyond the Himalayas. it was done. A replacement ball is praying for daily events and prayers. He dressed as a peasant, quietly walking in the mountains with a few at first in the middle of the night, and after a while, the main people joined and continued walking towards the border between China and India in groups of 200. .. After all, battles happened many times, and when it finally crossed the border into India, it was reduced to 70 people. That was 60 years ago.

Exile government in Dharamsala After that, the group arrived safely in Tawan. This is also the place where the temple of Dalai Lama V is located, and it is also the birthplace of Dalai Lama VI. This is an area where the Indian army protected the town from the border between Tibet and India for a long time, so the occupation from China was avoided. Of course, it’s India now. Since then, an exile government has been established in Dharamsala, and now about 20,000 Tibetans are outside Tibet and about 6 million Tibetans in China.

Very happy for all humanity

In this way, when the Dalai Lama went into exile in India, the information about the Dalai Lama and Tibet was passed on to the world. You probably don’t even know the existence of the Dalai Lama. Although you have lived a very difficult life, the universe is well made. His asylum was very happy for all humanity. If not, the world is truly grateful that I would have never touched Tibet, the Compassion, or the human excellence.Live up to 113 years

Mr. Dalai Lama is 3 years older than me, but he said “I will live until 113 years old”, so I said “I will live till then” and laughed together.

(Next time = Continued from October 26th issue)

About Dr. Kazuko Hillyer Tatsumura

View all posts by Dr. Kazuko Hillyer Tatsumura
Dr. Kazuko Hillyer Tatsumura
Dr. Kazuko was born into a distinguished old family in Kyoto, Japan, and graduated from Toho conservatory of Music in Tokyo. In 1961 she came to U.S. as a pianist sponsored by the Boston Symphony. She studied at Boston University, New York University, and received her Ph.D. in Oriental Medicine from New York State University and the International Academy of Education in Tokyo. From 1968 to 1992, she promoted cultural exchanges from East to West and vice versa, and became a world famous impresario, producing 2,000 events each year all over the world encompassing over 140 countries. In this connection, in 1972, she went to Dharamsala to find the lost Tibetan Folk Opera, and met His Holiness the Dalai Lama, with whom she remains a lifelong friend. In 1973 and 1991 she arranged and funded personally the tours of the Folk Opera of Tibet to the West. She has received many medals and honors from different countries. Her tireless life long work in Philanthropic field is vast and well known ranging from Save the Beacon Theater, Save the Boat People, Help the Homeless, natural disasters of earthquakes and tsunamis, as well as relief to AIDS and HIV positive children in Africa. She has been a dedicated Board Member to both the J. Luce Foundation and Orphans International for years. Her work focuses on the Tibetan people; Tibetan children remain especially strong in her heart. She raised fund for the new academic building for Manjushree Orphanage in Tawang, India and supported many aspects of the school. See HuffPo pieces entitled Japanese Holistic Healer in NYC to Build School for Tibetan Orphans in India, A Japanese Dinner with Raul Castro’s Daughter, and NYC Gala in Support of Tibetan Orphans Set for January.

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